Eraser 5.7: Gutman vs. US DoD vs. Pseudorandom

glc650

New Member
Hello,

Which is most secure when erasing specific files/folders?

TIA>
-g.
 

Carver

Member
Gutmann is considered the most secure for erasing specific files/folders, and Pseudorandom for erasing freespace.
 

garrett01

Administrator
Staff member
With modern drives the memory layers are getting thinner and more compact. The gutmann method was for drives of an older design.

These days (1-paranoid) pseudorandom passes might be better.

Garrett
 

Carver

Member
admin said:
With modern drives the memory layers are getting thinner and more compact. The gutmann method was for drives of an older design.

These days (1-paranoid) pseudorandom passes might be better.

Garrett
Enough of a change to warrent a change of the default (as it is downloaded) to pseudorandom.
 

glc650

New Member
admin said:
With modern drives the memory layers are getting thinner and more compact. The gutmann method was for drives of an older design.

These days (1-paranoid) pseudorandom passes might be better.

Garrett
And what would you define as modern? Certain brands/models? Certain drive technologies/designs? Or just certain time periods?
 

garrett01

Administrator
Staff member
>>Or just certain time periods?
yes It might even be time to revisit the whole area.

Garrett
 

Kythe

Member
It depends entirely upon the threat.

If you're talking about an Encase/Winhex/other forensics data gathering used on the drive, then one pass with all zeros will be sufficient.

If you're talking about physical examination of the original drive using the most advanced imaging techniques, then the more passes, the better. Gutmann would be the best in this case, simply because it uses so many overwrite passes. Whether it's overkill in terms of preventing some sort of data recovery (is 3 passes sufficient? 7 passes? that's not known), you'll have to decide for yourself.

Personally, I think if you're really that afraid of someone getting ahold of the drive who can bring rare techniques to bear, and you're that afraid that the data on the drive is overwhelmingly dangerous, then I'd be considering on the fly encryption of the drive contents, instead, and destroy the drive physically rather than overwrite/sell it when you're done.
 
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