Error: Nothing there to erase

A

Anonymous

Guest
When trying to erase a file located in a shared folder on remote server, I receive the following error message:
Information:
Statistics:

Erased area = 0 bytes

Cluster tips = 0 bytes



Data written = 0 bytes

Write time = 0.00 s

Failures:
Error: There was nothing to erase.


The file is located here \\SERVERNAME\ScanInbox\QI Folder
Is this large: 56.4 KB (57,766 bytes)
And takes up this much space on the HD: 60.0 KB (61,440 bytes)

The server is Win2K SP3, 2.4GHz Xeon, IBM Xseries 1GB RAM
HDD are 2 72GB SCSI and I am sorry I don't recall the raid, however I believe it is raid 0.(another volunteer handles that)

I am able to erase the file on the local disk, however I don't want users to make local copies. This is for protected health care quality management data. I want them to view the image from their PC on the server and then shred (use eraser) the file when done.

Could this be a permissions issue? The operation does not work whether I am a network user or the network admin.
I have taken off the cluster tip information check box
I am using the Guttman method

Any ideas?

Thanks,
Jeff
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
WTRS Infotech said:
When trying to erase a file located in a shared folder on remote server, I receive the following error message:
From the Eraser help file:

"Network Drives

You should never erase data from a drive over the network. It will not work as expected and your network administrator will hate you for jamming the network."
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Which is why Eraser refuses to touch remote files, it seems.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Anonymous said:
WTRS Infotech said:
When trying to erase a file located in a shared folder on remote server, I receive the following error message:
From the Eraser help file:

"Network Drives

You should never erase data from a drive over the network. It will not work as expected and your network administrator will hate you for jamming the network."
From the Eraser FAQ: How do I erase Network Files, Floppy Disks, CD-RW, DVD-RAM, DVD-RW? Just like normal drives.

Well isn't that special?

Thanks for the help.
Jeff
 
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