Which erasure method is the best ?

I do have read two three pages before posting this query. I have found one similar question here but it did not satisfy my curiosity. I want detailed comparison of those methods 'Eraser' uses.

I have found some info on the methods here: http://pcsupport.about.com/lr/data_sani ... 1108734/1/
But still these are not much satisfactory.

I don't want much underlying details how methods works rather I want to know which method to use that nobody could never anyhow recover what I delete. In Wikipedia I have read that "Gutmann 35 pass" is applied to older systems, so why Eraser makes it its default erasure method ?

I'm also very curious to know whether using 'Eraser deletion' for every file delete on my computer gonna corrupt or destroy the Hard disk or It will not have any bad effect at all.

I also somewhere read some of the professional tools that Government Agencies uses to delete or recover files. I would also love know about them.
One more thing - "Why there is no option to choose whether I want to start 'Eraser' at start up or not!
 

Joel

Active Member
curious_apprentice said:
I don't want much underlying details how methods works rather I want to know which method to use that nobody could never anyhow recover what I delete. In Wikipedia I have read that "Gutmann 35 pass" is applied to older systems, so why Eraser makes it its default erasure method ?
I've answered a similar question recently: http://bbs.heidi.ie/viewtopic.php?f=2&t=8588.

curious_apprentice said:
I'm also very curious to know whether using 'Eraser deletion' for every file delete on my computer gonna corrupt or destroy the Hard disk or It will not have any bad effect at all.
It should not cause any bad consequences. The amount of data Eraser puts on your disk should be negligible, unless you really churn through your files.

curious_apprentice said:
I also somewhere read some of the professional tools that Government Agencies uses to delete or recover files. I would also love know about them.
I would love to know too, unfortunately that information doesn't seem to be in the public domain.

curious_apprentice said:
One more thing - "Why there is no option to choose whether I want to start 'Eraser' at start up or not!
I've detailed the answer to this questions in the Architecture FAQ.
 
The greater the number of passes, the better the security, at the cost of execution time.
I have told you I have already read that topic. I have mentioned the page where I found some information about underlying method details. After reading those anyone could simply became confused which one to choose. And the default method. Well if you scrub a paper using a rubber 35 times it will surely torn out. Don't you think there's a possibility of damaging the HDD ?!!

As you have said more passes means more security, So do I conclude Gutmann 35 pass is the best ? I'm using 'US AIRFORCE 5220' 3 Pass method. Is it any good ?
 
Correction : I also somewhere read some of the professional tools that Government Agencies uses to delete or recover files. I would also love know about them.
Well I have read about some tools which are used by professionals. Those tools are following government standards. Sorry for the confusing remark.


And forgive my English. Im no good with it. :(
 

Joel

Active Member
curious_apprentice said:
I have told you I have already read that topic. I have mentioned the page where I found some information about underlying method details. After reading those anyone could simply became confused which one to choose. And the default method.
Yes. You're missing out my next statement.
Joel said:
However, since most people do not need that high levels of security, one pass is sufficient for most people, and there is currently no evidence that once data has been removed via a one-pass erase any data can be recovered. Having said that, there are some people who would like to use a greater number of passes.
curious_apprentice said:
Well if you scrub a paper using a rubber 35 times it will surely torn out. Don't you think there's a possibility of damaging the HDD ?!!
A metal platter with magnetic polarity is much more durable than that. Yes it would wear the disk out faster, but only by a negligible amount. The thing that usually fails in mechanical drives is the disk head, and that's flying whether you write or read data. It is exacerbated by seeking, so if you leave your drive alone during an erasure it should have no measurable adverse effect.

curious_apprentice said:
Well I have read about some tools which are used by professionals. Those tools are following government standards. Sorry for the confusing remark.
You can try using FTK (Forensic Toolkit). If you are feeling adventurous, just dig in with a Hex editor.
 
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